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Can My Kids Watch This Movie? Family Movie Guidance...For Parents.

Our parent movie reviews let you know which new releases to take your kids to and which ones you may want to hold off on.

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ToSpaceAndBack ChesapeakeFamilyMovieReviewKernel Rating (out of 5): whole-popcorn-kernalwhole-popcorn-kernalwhole-popcorn-kernal

MPAA Rating: G          Length: 25 minutes

Age Appropriate For: 6+. This informative short film is about how space technology has affected everyday life, so it has some imaging of the interior of the human body, including eyes and the brain; young children might find those images slightly gross or frightening. Other than that, nothing questionable.

‘To Space and Back’ is technically marvelous, presented in extremely impressive 60-frames-per-second. It’s a nice experience, but the educational content feels lacking in detail in comparison.

By Roxana Hadadi

Technically, producer, director, and co-writer Annette Sotheran-Barnett’s documentary “To Space and Back” is astonishing. Presented in 8K resolution and at 60 frames per second, the film is full of detailed images, bright colors, and extremely realistic 3-D models of the International Space Station, Space X capsule, Saturn V rocket, and various planets in our solar system. For any viewer, it’s a visual marvel. But the educational content of “To Space and Back” fails in comparison, relying too often on a modern mentality that feels like pandering to the audience.

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ALetterToMomo ChesapeakeFamilyMovieReviewKernel Rating (out of 5): whole-popcorn-kernalwhole-popcorn-kernalwhole-popcorn-kernalhalf-popcorn-kernal

MPAA Rating: NR       Length: 120 minutes

Age Appropriate For: 10+. The film is NR, but its content is worthy of a PG rating. The protagonist’s father dies in the film; the guardians that come to protect her are weird-looking imps that are rude, fart often, and steal food (and you see the butt of one while he’s in the bathroom); and there is the discussion of grief and the appropriate way to accept the death of a loved one.

The animated film ‘A Letter to Momo’ mixes a lot of different realistic and uncanny elements—a consideration of the afterlife, monstrous imps—to explore childhood grief. Although the film drags on a bit too long, its ideas hit close to home.

By Roxana Hadadi

A children’s movie about the death of a parent is not a unique concept. Take a look at all the classic Disney movies and you’ll be surprised by how many of them have single parents: Simba watches his father die, the death of Cinderella’s mother leaves her with the wicked stepmother and stepsisters, Ariel’s father just doesn’t understand her. So the Japanese animated film “A Letter to Momo,” in which 11-year-old Momo is being raised alone by her mother, isn’t atypical; how the film treats the grieving process, and the way it allows its main character to work through her feelings, is.

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Our parent movie reviews let you know which new releases to take your kids to and which ones you may want to hold off on.

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