Ways preteens can make money other than selling painted rocks — FranklyStein

Lemonade standWhen I was a kid, my sister and I loved having sales in our front yard. Lemonade, painted rocks, old toys — you name it, we'd sell it.

We started one summer after we'd spent a rainy vacation at the beach painting rocks and shells. Once we got home, my mother suggested we have a little sale to sell our crafts. We had so much fun that it became an annual tradition. In fact, we liked having sales so much that we started having them all the time — selling just about anything in the house we cold get our hands on.

The sales earned us just a little spending money for our trips to the local dime store. I'd buy press-on nails or candy or cheap earrings. But it wasn't really about the money. We loved standing on the corner, yelling at the passing cars and manning our outdoor pop-up junk shop.

If your preteen is looking for a way to earn money this summer — or even just a constructive way to pass the time — check out our story that gives the ins and outs of a few jobs fit for tweens. Kids too young to hold down a job have several great options to earn cash — from lemonade stands to dog walking — and the story offers tips on how to get them started.

My own kids had their fair share of lemonade stands when they were younger, and one hot day earned more than $20. (That's Jonah pictured with his friend, Lars, trying to earn a buck when they were much littler). Lawn mowing has been pretty lucrative for my older son, who got a great gig with the neighbors next door when he was 11 or 12. He even managed to hold onto the job when they sold the house and new neighbors moved in.

Meanwhile Jonah, now 12, needs something to do this summer. I'm going to suggest he start marketing himself as a dog walker. He loves animals so it seems the perfect fit. Anyone need someone to walk their dog this summer? Let me know!

To read more FranklyStein click here

Fam2016 W

FranklyStein is a blog by Chesapeake Family Life editor Betsy Stein, who lives in Catonsville with her husband, Chris, and four children, Maggie, 18, Lilly, 16, Adam, 16, and Jonah, 12.