10 Thanksgiving Cooking Terms You May Recognize But Don't Know

Thanksgiving cookAs we dive into the holiday season, our lives seem to mimic Thanksgiving dinner with way too much on our plates!  Our days are filled with shopping, decorating, family and the ever stressful cooking.

Why can’t making a dish be as easy as making it disappear?

As you prepare to whip up your favorite fixings on Thursday, Dictionary.com has created an easily digestible list of confusing culinary terms involved with cooking. Check out the site to learn more terms and how to say them!

Blanch – 1. to scald briefly and then drain, as peaches or almonds to facilitate removal of skins, or as rice or macaroni to separate the grains or strands. 2. to scald or parboil (meat or vegetables) so as to whiten, remove the odor, prepare for cooking by other means, etc.

Broil – 1. to cook by direct heat, as on a gridiron over the heat or in an oven under the heat; grill: to broil a steak. 2. to scorch; make very hot.

Coddle (if you are cuddling your eggs or fruit, you are doing it wrong) – to cook in water that is just below the boiling point; cook gently.

Crimp (there is no hot iron or leg warmers involved with this) – 1. to pinch and press down the edges of (a pie crust), esp. to seal together the top and bottom layers of pastry. 2. to gash (the flesh of a live fish or of one just killed) with a knife to make more crisp when cooked.

Flambé – to pour liquor over and ignite.

Devil (make sure to remove the horns) – to prepare (food, usually minced) with hot or savory seasoning: to devil eggs.

Dredge – to sprinkle or coat with some powdered substance, esp. flour.

Julienne (nope, not the blonde from DWTS) – cut into thin strips or small, match like pieces.

Sauté – to cook in a small amount of fat; pan-fry.

Score (football fans, you won’t find this on the TV) – to cut ridges or lines into (meat, fish, etc.) with shallow slashes, usually in a diamond pattern, before cooking.

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