Family Movie Review: The Kings of Summer (R)

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TheKingsofSummer ChesapeakeFamilyMovieReviewKernel Rating (out of 5): whole-popcorn-kernalwhole-popcorn-kernalwhole-popcorn-kernalwhole-popcorn-kernal

MPAA Rating: R       Length: 93 minutes

Age Appropriate for: 14+. The film has a lot of cursing, some underage drinking, and a scene where a character kills a rabbit for food and skins it. But although the language is its biggest problem, the film is a really successful look at young teenagers struggling to connect with their parents, rejecting that relationship, and ultimately realizing the importance of that bond, so it will certainly work as a film for families to watch together and use to spark discussions.

It would be easy to write 'The Kings of Summer' off as a movie that tries too hard, with its hip soundtrack and slow-motion visuals and quirky relationships. But in its exploration of the line dividing childhood and adulthood, the film does a lot without seemingly doing too much. It comes out as delightfully, invigoratingly effortless.

By Roxana Hadadi

There is a point early on in "The Kings of Summer" when 14-year-old Joe (Nick Robinson), sick of chafing up against his father's dictatorial authority, decides to run away to the woods and build a house there to live in with his two friends. "We make the rules, you know, like men," he says. It's a very simple premise—boy goes into nature to find himself—but that familiarity doesn't ruin "The Kings of Summer." In fact, it's the relatable quality of the characters' yearning, that need to figure out the kind of person you want to be, that brings the film together.

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