Popcorn Parents - Family Movie Reviews

Movie Tuesday: Iron Man (PG-13)

Coming in to the sure-to-be-blockbuster Iron Man, I had very little knowledge beforehand of the story. After doing a bit of research of the Marvel comics, I became quite familiar with the character of Iron Man but was curious to find out whether the movie would do the vintage comic character justice. I'd rather not ruin the story line for those persistent movie goers and comic fans, but the movie, directed Jon Favreau, focused highly upon the development of Iron Man and his journey for good. 

Movie Tuesday: Speed Racer (PG)

Speed Racer

Directed by The Wachowski Brothers (Andy, Larry)

Starring Emile Hirsch, Christina Ricci, Susan Sarandon, John Goodman, Matthew Fox, Paulie Litt

Opens May 9, 2008

Screened May 11, 2008

Rated PG

 

 

Child’s play is littered with toys, but driven by imagination. Kids are picky about their playthings, to be sure, but they’re also experts at rewriting the “rules” of the game. Any parent who has watched their child play gleefully inside the cardboard box that accompanied their brand new $200 toy set has learned (or remembered) a fundamental axiom of play: You may want a toy because it can do something—light up, transform, pee—but you play with a toy because it can do anything.

Movie Monday: Kung Fu Panda

Kung Fu Panda is the story of a panda named Po (voice of Jack Black), whose father, Mr. Ping (voice of James Hong) runs a noodle shop and anticipates that his son will follow in his footsteps. Po, however, secretly yearns to join the “Furious Five,” which includes characters named Monkey (Jackie Chan), Tigress (Angelina Jolie), Mantis (Seth Rogen), Viper (Lucy Liu) and Crane (David Cross), in kung fu combat.

The entire village climbs seemingly endless stairs to the ancient temple where the kung fu warriors train, to learn who will be chosen by Oogway (Randall Duk Kim), master of the ancient temple, to be the Dragon Warrior and gain the secret power of the Dragon Scroll.

Po barely makes it up the stairs only to have the gates of the temple closed before he can reach them; he eventually catapults himself into the center of the temple square and is, of course, chosen as the dragon warrior, much to the dismay of the Furious Five. Master Shifu (Dustin Hoffman), who trained the Furious Five, at first tries to drive away Po, but Oogway assures Shifu that Po is destined to be Dragon Warrior, then dies, leaving Shifu determined to train Po. 

Meanwhile, the evil Tai Lung (Ian McShane) escapes from the supposedly inescapable prison, the Furious Five sets out to defeat Tai Lung and instead are themselves defeated. Po discovers that there is no secret contained in the Dragon Scroll; the power is to believe in himself. Armed with this newfound knowledge, he confronts and, of course, defeats Tai Lung.

Some of the images produced for this movie are truly beautiful, and certain scenes have positive messages, such as Shifu’s decision to build on Po’s strengths and Po’s determination to never give up. The Furious Five comes to accept Po by the end of the story, and the main characters all have moments of self-realization. 

Sadly, the underlying themes of this story include constant references to Po being fat and suggest that his incompetence is a direct result of his size. The movie is filled with violent action scenes, both as slapstick attempts at humor and during the fight scenes. While most of the fighting is restricted to the Furious Five, Po, Shifu, and Tai Lung, during one scene Tai Lung lays waste to the entire contingent of guards posted at the prison. 

Tai Lung’s glowing yellow eyes are a little spooky for some kids, and many of the scenes are, if not scary, at least startling (especially at the volume of sound encountered in the typical movie theater!) The movie ends on a positive note, and contains very little offensive language (at most, you’ll hear the word  “stupid” and “idiot.”)>While not particularly good or funny, the movie is harmless.

By Suzanne Frazier

Movie Tuesday: WALL-E (G)

Movie Tuesday – WALL-E

 

by Jared Peterson

 

WALL-E is the latest computer-animated film from Pixar, the talented folks who made

Movie Tuesday: The Dark Knight (PG-13)

by Jared Peterson
 
It’s worth saying up front: The Dark Knight probably should have been rated R. The violence, menace, and upsetting images, imaginative as they all are, are still so pervasive that the total effect could be truly disturbing even for older teens. Your parental guidance might properly lead your kids down the hall to another film or back home to a good book. Adults should consider toughing it out, though, because the film is a triumph—taut, suspenseful, sophisticated, thrilling and (as I exhaust the film reviewers’ thesaurus) action-packed.
 
By night, brooding billionaire Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale, poker-faced) dons cape and cowl to fight crime in the shadows of a sprawling megalopolis called Gotham. Opinion regarding the caped crusader is mixed; some see a defender of justice, others a dangerous vigilante. The police, who officially want to catch him, secretly appreciate his help.
 
As crime begins to fall and hope begins to rise, Wayne is on the lookout for his replacement: a crusader who can stand in the light, without a mask. He believes he’s found one in the principled new district attorney Harvey Dent (Aaron Eckhart, more than meets the eye), who also happens to be dating Bruce’s girl-that-got-away, Rachel Dawes (Maggie Gyllenhaal, the cat’s meow). Rachel knows about Bruce’s night job, and she once promised they’d be together if he gave up the Bat. He hopes that when Dent becomes the hero he can step down and Rachel can keep her word. As usual, it’s more complicated than that.
 
Meanwhile, crime has a new face, and it isn’t pretty. With streaky hair and smeared clown makeup, the Joker (Heath Ledger, a marvel) is a wide-awake nightmare. He sews destruction and reaps fear. He’s the ultimate terrorist, in that the terror is all he cares about. And he sees Batman as his perfect nemesis—a fellow costumed “freak”—and he aims to pull the city down around them both, all in good fun.
 
The Joker was Ledger’s last completed film role; he died suddenly earlier this year at the age of 28. There has been talk of a posthumous Oscar nomination, which would be a touching tribute to a talented young man taken too soon. But tribute or no, this may actually be the best performance of the year. Ledger is amazing. His Joker is at once casually menacing yet distressingly smart. You’ll never be comfortable when he’s on screen, but you won’t be able to take your eyes off him.
 
As hero and villain collide, the superheroics are plentiful and satisfying. With so many summer blockbusters dominated by computer-generated absurdity, it’s genuinely thrilling to see wonders unfold “in camera.” And so the most spectacular moment in the entire film occurs when something real and three-dimensional and huge—something that should definitely not flip completely over—flips completely over. Any audience might understandably leap to its feet and cheer at such a phenomenal sight. At my screening, I think people were simply too stunned to move.
 
As previously noted, the violence is pervasive and extreme. Batman’s whuppings are brutal but non-lethal—he has rules. It’s the Joker who delights in finding new and vicious ways to end lives. One character is severely disfigured and we see the results in some detail, but even wounds that occur “off-frame” are blood-curdling. There is limited profanity—a single H, GD, and SOB. No sexual shenanigans here, only one or two kisses that seal some fates.
 
Though far darker than any previous incarnation of the Batman story, The Dark Knight is nevertheless an impressive piece of art. You’ll walk away drained—and dazzled.
 
---
 
At a July 19th screening the previews, each approved for the PG-13 audience, included the following: Body of Lies (R); Terminator Salvation (R); Watchmen (R); The Mummy III (PG-13); The Day the Earth Stood Still (not yet rated); Quantum of Solace (not yet rated); Tropic Thunder (R).
 
 

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